The online court will not be mandatory

By David Asker on

The post-consultation report for the consultation paper, Transforming our justice system: summary of reforms and consultation, has been published.

One of the areas the consultation covered was assisted digital facilities, i.e. the support required, particularly by litigants in person, to access court services online.

The report clearly states that use of digital channels will not be mandatory.

Developing the assisted digital channels

The assisted digital channels are to support “digitally excluded” people who either do not have access to digital channels or struggle to use them. The channels will be: telephone, web chat and paper.

When developing digital services, the report states that they will undertake user research and testing when piloting services to make sure what is delivered meets users’ needs, as well as assess the level of demand.

National face-to-face assisted digital services network

One other issue that was raised in the consultation responses was limited or no access to technology for some users users for example, some users may find the cost of technology unaffordable or may not have fast enough broadband in their area. To deal with this, there will be a network of partners who will provide face-to-face assisted digital services nationally, including in rural areas, along with paper channels for those who need them. This face-to-face support will be free for end users and telephone calls to the customer service centre will be low cost or free.

David Asker

David is an authorised High Court Enforcement Officer and our Director of Corporate Governance

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